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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
the fiscal cliff talks? >> right now, susie, the fiscal cliff talks are clearly the item dejure for the stock market. i think most people expect exactly what eric miller was talking about from the fed. and bern bueno ben bernanke hasn transparent and telling people well in advance what he is going to do. the $85 billion should continue building up for our taxpayers balance sheet. >> susie: how does all of this play out in the markets. all of the bond buying, companies are still lding off from hiring and spending, and now the risk, possibly of a recession. how does it play out in the markets for 2013? >> what has happened, with all of this cash going into the market -- into the economy, not only from the u.s. fed, but from europe, from the central bank there, as well as from china, don't forget, so we've had this liquidity which has taken asset prices with the stock market and the bond markets, pricing it way up, it is actually helping housing after a long wait. moving into the future, there will be some duction in relythe fear that people have. it is not only a lack of confidence, but it is a
. >> susie: investors will beor mn those fiscal cliff talks, and they will also be studying tomorrow's importa")jé:0@6cj& but josh feinman says the november numbers won't give an accurate picture of the labor market. he's chief economist at d.b. advisors. >> reporter: hi, josh, so you're talking about distortions in that report. tell us more. >> yes, hi, susie. i think that the hurricane sandy may distort the numbers. we've seen it in some of the othehigh frequency data in the last couple of weeks. keep in mind tomorrow's labor market report will report on a snapshot of the labor market taken in the middle of last month. and that's when the hurricane and its aftermath were having their effects. >> so the consensus numbers from a survey of economists, they're expecting american businesses added 110,000 jobs it to their payroll. the unemployment rate staying around 7.9%. does that sit right with you. is that what you are seeing? >> probably somewhere around that maybe a little less. one of the problems is it is harto gauge exactly what the impact of the storm will have. we know it's t
's governors met with president obama today about what they need to see in a fiscal cliff deal. we talk with delaware governor jack markell. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. a coalition of the nation's top c.e.o.s is feeling pessimistic about getting a fiscal cliff deal. the group's leader joins us, maya macguinneas. >> tom: and luxury fashion meets the mass market. who wins with target's pairing with neiman marcus? >> susie: that and more tonight on nbr! >> tom: there wasn't much obvious ground given today between president obama and congressional republicans in the effort to avoid the fiscal cliff in january. president obama repeated his pledge he's open to new ideas, but is holding firm on his call for higher taxes on top income earners, something missing from the g.o.p. plan. with just three weeks left, the two sides are still at odds with their opening offers. th time ticking away to reach a deal before tax cuts expire and spending cuts hit, president obama today said he's still optimistic a deal will be done and he's willing to compromise, but negotiations just aren't there yet. >> it'
was one of six governors meeting with president obama today to talk about how the fiscal cliff impacts their states. i asked him what was his message to the president. >> our message was pretty straightforward. we believe that it is important that governors have a seat at the table as the president and leaders in congress are negotiating issues around the fiscal cliff. we think it is really important that they get something done because, obviously, if tax rates go up on middle-class americans come next month, it will be bad for those middle-class americans, it is will be bad for our states, and we're concerned about both the fiscal side and the economic growth side. >> susie: so talk to us a little bit about what kind of deal you would like to see. what were you proposing to the president? >> let's put it this way, if money is just shifted from the federal government to the states, that's not really saving anything. and the president understands that. we think it is really important. recognizing if there are cuts in funds, there ought to be a corresponding reduction in some of the requ
medicare cuts that could be part of a fiscal cliff deal. we talk with maryland congressman chris van hollen. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. two hurricanes in two years for the northeast-- a region not used to big storms comes to terms with the cleanup and cost. >> susie: and it's green monday, one of the most popular days for online shoppers. we've got details. >> tom: that and more tonight on nbr! >> susie: president obama was in michigan today, campaigning on his plan to avert the fiscal cliff. speaking to union workers at the daimler detroit diesel engine plant, the president said he is willing to compromise "a little bit" with republicans on getting a plan for economic growth, job creation, and reducing the deficit. but he said he would not compromise on raising tax rates for high-income earners. >> and that's a principle i won't compromise on because i'm not going to have a situation where the wealthiest among us, including folks like me, get to keep all our tax breaks, and then we're asking students to pay higher student loans, or suddenly, a school doesn't have school books because the scho
than its namesake metals. we'll explain. more tough talk today from washington on the fiscal cliff: treasury secretary timothy geithner said he's willing to go over it if republicans don't agree to tax hikes for the wealthiest americans. president obama said basically the same thing but added one more hard line to the negotiations. >> if congress in any way suggests that they're going to tie negotiations to a debt ceiling vote and take us to the brink of default once again, as part of a budget negotiation-- which, by the way, we have never done in our history until we did it last year-- i will not play that game. >> late todathe president spoke by telephone with house speaker john boehner. no specifics on what they said to each other, but it was their first conversation in a week. eventually the two sides will get down to bargaining over specifics, including entitlements. one idea may be to change the way the government measures inflation. that may sound like a small change, but, as darren gersh reports, it could have a big impact. >> reporter: if the price of oranges goes up, cons
stability in several markets but there's talk about limiting mortgage deductions with the fiscal cliff negotiations sometime next year. couldn't that impact the recovery? >> it could. obviously it might be relegated to more affluent households in terms on of the ability to do a deduction either in full or part. tend of the day there's a large household informq.rjz that's occur that's going to drive perspective homeowners into the market regardless. >> tom: let's get to the pic3sb here. you do like housing stocks with the home builders etf. what do you anticipate. they've had a nice run already. >> they've been terrific. >> tom: put new money to work. >> they've doubled or better and yes we would. they may be subject to profit taking but nonetheless we still think we're in the early innings of the house recovery. >> tom: you also like technology. is this a play on your business investment expectations for next year. >> it is, if business wallets open up we expect the destination for some of that money to go towardsxd more productive enhancing tools and they've been under investing in
report" he is optimistic about getting a fiscal cliff deal by the end of they year. maryland congressman chris van hollen talked with our darren gersh, and began with an update on the status of the talks. >> well, the good news is that the president and the speaker of the house are now in face-to-face discussions. it's always better to be talking than not. the other development is that increasingly congressional republicans recognize that the position that they had staked out is unsustainable. >> one of the arguments we hear from some democrats is that the fiscal cliff isn't really a cliff, it's more like a slope and you could gradually go down it and the withholding from tax wouldn't kick in for a while and the spending cuts wouldn't hurt the economy for a while. do you think it is good idea to go over the deliver and it is more of a slope. >> no, i think would be a mistake to go over the fiscal cliff because it could set in motion lots of things that could be a drag on the economy. that being said, i think if it's clear that the parties were working toward a negotiation, that you could
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)